Bhujodi | Simple is what it takes to Happy

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Have you ever been to a place, looked at the innocence of the people there, and thought to yourself that how effortless it is for them to stay content & happy? I am sure many of you who trek a lot or have closely stayed with locals in mountains can relate to this – they have a hard but simple life, they want too less & always have a contagious smile on their faces. Something similar I experienced in Bhujodi, even though by all means this place is becoming a tourist haunt as we speak.

Bhujodi is a really tiny village, some 10 kms from Bhuj in the Kutch region of Gujarat. If you are from a big city, you can totally count it as another neighbourhood in the Bhuj city itself. So, why exactly it is famous? Well, it is not as well-known as it should be but what its known for is its handicrafts. This tiny village has a small number of homes, which you can count on your hand actually and almost all of them work on creating traditional crafts. They have that weaving equipment installed inside their houses (don’t know what it’s called) & they create clothes and other handicrafts throughout the year, while most of their sale happens in the tourist season of Kutch region (Nov-Feb). The locals have other income sources in the form of dairy etc.

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If you compare the handicrafts here to other parts of Kutch which cater to tourists on a larger scale, you will notice that the prices of things are similar, however you get much better quality products in Bhujodi & in so much variety! Most importantly, what else can replace the joy of buying something handmade & supporting small businesses? In fact, I was a bit surprised to see almost all the local houses keeping equipment for making clothes. Precisely why I am writing this post.

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I didn’t click a lot of pictures because I was too busy looking around at everything available with wide open eyes. Shawls, suits, purses, bags, kurtas for both men & women, saris, leather products, home decor & furnishings, every thing was there. In today’s time, it’s not difficult to find these Kutch handicrafts elsewhere also, however once you are there, you will understand the abundance of choices & the amazingly good quality!

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Other than the products themselves, I was very mesmerized by how well these people maintain their houses. Not only were they clean & well-kept, they even had beautiful traditional decorations, probably to make their house (which also houses their business) stand out more since almost every house sells similar things! The locals are so nice, no matter how much you bargain, they will indulge you with their charming smiles & continue the bargaining game. Many of them will even force you to have tea before you leave. 🙂

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On that note, I want to say that Bhujodi has been an unexpected but a very fulfilling experience for me. I am always interested in seeing handicrafts getting made, it kind of consoles me that these things are not dying. However, I was not expecting this when we set out for Bhujodi. I just thought it will be like a handicrafts exhibition. Once there, I felt like I am in a village, but instead of people chilling in a village, it’s just outsiders shopping in the village. 😀 If you love handicrafts as much as I do, you should definitely not miss Bhujodi.

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New free marketplace in India: What are you missing out on?

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With so many shopping websites popping left, right and centre, apart from being spoilt for choice as a buyer, what comes to mind is how much easier it has become if you simply want to sell something.

This idea of setting up a small business, without any investment in building a physical store or even a website of your own, is very appealing. This is what ezebee.com gives you. It provides you with a platform to start a small shop on their website. 

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The best part is that the basic version of ezebee.com is free. As from the website itself – “Users are able to open an unlimited amount of Shops, add infinite products to their shops, and best of all, there are no commission fees for transactions completed through ezebee”. Other than this, they also have a premium version where you get priority as a seller.

For more details about how both the versions work, how ezebee.com earns money or anything else, you can also check out the FAQ section of their website ezebee.com.

What I liked most about this website was that no matter which part of the world you are in, just type in the city in which you want to look for stuff and you will get city-specific results.

The other thing that sealed the deal for me was that there is no end to what all one can find here. Check for example this vintage chair that I came across while random browsing.

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Tell me, would you ever be able to find something like this in any of the regular brand shops? ezebee.com shops will take you to numerous such things because anybody can build anything (product or service) and sell it. 🙂 So, it is more likely to find unique things.

The site also has a good design and layout. A clean, white base with everything placed on it in tiles, kind of like Pinterest, one of my favorite ways of displaying things.

What also stands out is how ezebee is giving access to European market (where it was founded) to the small businesses that use its marketplace in India.

I think the idea of having such a marketplace, especially for both goods & services, is quite helpful for small businesses, as they cannot afford to invest a lot, take too many risks or build an elaborate strategy. On top of that, if they had opened a physical store, they would have had access to only their local market, unlike here where they get access to many foreign markets too.

So, if you are someone who is good at making handmade earrings or soaps, or even want to tell people about your cooking skills & have cooking classes, join ezebee right now and sell your forte.

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Oh, and, these are just examples. You can sell all kinds of diverse things on this free marketplace, so go and take a look 🙂

Happy Republic Day! | Monday Mumbles 8

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Hello World and special hello fellow Indians! 🙂 Happy Republic Day to all of us. I had a different post planned for today’s Monday Mumbles and I had drafted some of it sometime back, but let’s do this today. 🙂

I didn’t watch the entire parade today (and I don’t think I have ever done it), but when I was watching my favorite part, the state displays (Jhanki), I literally had tears in my eyes because of the cultural richness that our country boasts of and this, my friends, was only for representational purposes. Last night, I read this post by Verseherder and I realized that even though he couldn’t relate to the Madras things that the another blog mentioned (you need to read the post for the context), I am sure both of the Madras versions exist. We have so much cultural and religious diversity, let’s not even go to the geographical diversities, that everyone has their own version of a place, sometimes overlapping with each other’s version and sometimes not, and it is something to be really, really proud of. So much of art, so much of handicraft, so much of culture is lying everywhere you go in India, its marvelous! I hope I am able to contribute towards conserving the arts and cultures of our country in some way because let’s face it, slowly, little by little, we are losing it. I do have things in my mind but I don’t know whether I’ll be able to materialize them.

Anyway, tell me, do you have any memories about watching the Republic Day Parade, LIVE or on TV? By the way, once we went for watching it LIVE and it was one hell of an experience!

If you want to ask or share anything with the readers, we can do that in next Monday Mumbles. Drop me an email at srish.myblog@gmail.com.

PS: Look at today’s Google doodle, the best part is it highlights my favorite thing from the parade, the state and other things moving displays.

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